Stemcelldoc's Weblog

March 24, 2009

Vulcan Shoulder Support

vulkan-half-shoulder-supportVulcan Shoulder supports are commonly used for dislocated shoulder, frozen shoulder, broken collar bone, and  rotator cuff injuries.  In concept the neoprene support provides therapeutic heat, support and shoulder pain relief. The compression and warmth can also provide pain relief following shoulder surgery.

How does it work?

The support fastens securely around the shoulder with the Velcro straps to provide support and re-assurance following injury.  If the injury is mild and you are of good health and not taking any know toxins to your own stem cells, it is possible for some of these injuries to improve.  Unfortunately as we age, the vitality of our stem cells and their ability to mount a successful response to injury declines.  The result is continued pain due to incomplete healing.  Immobilizing the joint also goes against the finding supported by Sen who demonstrated mechanical stress led mesenchynmal stem cells to change into cartilage and bone as opposed to fat.

 

At the Centeno-Schultz Clinic we are committed to identifying and correcting the underlying program.  Prolotherapy often used  successfully to treat rotator cuff injuries, AC joint and shoulder dislocations if damaged has occurred to the supporting ligaments.

A non-surgical alternative for  partially torn rotator cuff tendons, dislocation of shoulders and acromio-clavicular injuries is the use of your own stem cells. At Regenexx a patient’s own bone-marrow-derived stem cells are isolated, expanded and then injected exactly into the area of damage under intermittent x-ray guidance. 

Intermittent X-ray to ensure accurate placement of MSC

Intermittent X-ray to ensure accurate placement of MSC

 Utilizing your own stem cells (autologous) prevents the transmission of disease.

Please review testimonial of a patient who had bilateral rotator cuff tears who previously underwent surgery on one side and elected stem cell therapy for the other side.

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January 27, 2009

Pain radiating down my arm after shoulder surgery

Pain radiating down the arm after shoulder surgery can and does occur.  The cause of radiating arm pain can arise from the one of many sources:  inappropriate or prolonged positioning, cervical injury or aggravation  and hematoma.  First and foremost the arm is often positioned such that it is hanging and as such may be exposed to a inappropriate or prolonged traction and tension  placed on the shoulder joint.

shoulder-arthroscopy

This can cause an injury to the shoulder joint and or the brachial plexus, a bundle of nerves that cross the first rib and provide sensation and motor function to the arm and hand.

brachial-plexus

A second cause of pain radiating down the arm is a cervical disc injury or aggravation caused at time of surgery due to positioning.  The patient is put to sleep while resting on their back but are repositioned after they are asleep to optimize the working conditions for the surgery.  The neck, shoulder and arm are all moved.  If particular attention is not directed to the patient during the positioning, a cervical disc may be injured or aggravated.  The result is a pain radiating down the arm (cervical radiculopathy).

cervical-readic

Another cause of pain radiating down the arm is a expanding blood clot otherwise known as a hematoma.  If left untreated the hematoma can compress critical blood vessels and nerves with resultant arm pain.

The morale of the story is that surgery and anesthesia are not without significant risks.  Fortunately patients with shoulder dysfunction now have the opportunity to use stem cell therapy to regenerate damaged ligaments, tendons and worn cartilage in the joint without surgery or anesthesia.   Regenexx is a simple needle-in, needle-out procedure which allows patients to use their own stem cells to regenerate damaged joints, lumbar discs and non healing long bone fractures.

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January 19, 2009

Treatments for Shoulder Separation

Shoulder separation injurycommonly involves the acromioclavicular joint ( AC joint).   The AC joint is where the clavicle meets the highest point of the shoulder blade (acromion).  

ac-joint Three ligaments support the acromio-clavicular joint; the cocrocoacromial, corococlavicular (CC) and acromioclavicular ligaments(AC). Ligaments are soft tissue structures that connect bones to bones.

ac-joint-ligaments

Falls directly on the shoulder can injure the ligaments that stabilize the AC joint.

If the force is severe enough,  the AC ligament and or coracoclavicular (CC) ligaments can tear with resultant separation of the clavicle and acromion.   The result is a bump on the shoulder.

Treatment options include surgery if the pain continues or if the deformity is severe. Often the end of the collarbone is cut out so that it does not rub against the acromion along with reconstruction of the ligaments.

Other successful treatment options include prolotherapy and stem cell therapy to repair damaged ligaments and joints. At the Centeno-Schultz Clinic prolotherapy has been utilized extensively to strengthen loose or torn shoulder ligaments.  At Regenexx a patient’s own stem cells are use to repair torn ligaments and damaged joints.  Both therapies enable the patient to forgo the risks of surgery and the time, expense and pain of shoulder surgery rehabilitation.

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