Stemcelldoc's Weblog

September 16, 2012

Prolotherapy: Creating Stability

At the Centeno-Schultz Clinic stability is a central theme.  The importance of stability is discussed in Ortho 2.0.   The integrity of a joint is directly related to its stability.  Joint instability predisposes to additional injury and acceleration of the degenerative process.

Stability is the foundation or structural support of a joint.  A crumbling or weak foundation can not support a tall structure.   Instability can not support an active, healthy joint.

At the Centeno-Schultz Clinic prolotherapy is an effective treatment for joint instability.  Prolotherapy is regenerative injection procedure where a chemical irritant is used to cause a chemical micro-injury.  The irritant stimulates the body’s healing mechanism to repair and strengthen the degenerative and weakened tissues.  Prolotherapy initiates a three stage healing process:

Inflammatory:  occurs within the first week characterized by increased blood flow and swelling.

Fibroblastic:  1-6 weeks with fbroblasts creating new collagen and repairing injured tissue.

Maturation:  after 6 weeks characterized by stronger, more organized tissue.

Clinical examples where prolotherapy can be used to create stability include:

Supra and interspinous ligaments in lumbar spine.

Tendinosis & tendonitis of rotator cuff.

Lateral and medial epicondylitis.

Ankle sprains.

Antibiotic induced tendon damage.

ACL laxity or small tears.  Autologous stem cell therapy has been successfully used in full thickness tears in the ACL.

Stability is critical and prolotherapy is an effective therapy to stabilize a joint.

January 10, 2011

Shoulder Pain and Ultrasound Guided Injections

Platelet rich plasma, prolotherapy and autologous stem cells are non-surgical treatments for shoulder pain.  Clinical success is dependent upon selecting the appropriate treatment option and placing the solution into the targeted site.

Ultrasound has become the standard of care at the Centeno-Schultz Clinic.  Ultrasound does not involve exposure to x-rays and provides a rich image of the bone, muscles, tendons and ligaments. It also allows for a dynamic evaluation whereby the patient is able to go through the activities that cause them pain.  This is not the case with MRI’s given that they require a patient to remain completely still.  MRI’s provide a static image of the shoulder which may not be helpful in some cases of impingement.

This last weekend Ron Hanson M.D. was an instructor at a highly respected shoulder ultrasound course.

We are very pleased to have Ron’s gifted clinical and ultrasound skills here in Denver/Boulder area at the Centeno-Schultz Clinic.

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