Stemcelldoc's Weblog

November 3, 2013

Iliolumbar Ligament: A Key Stabilizer of the lumbar spine

At the Centeno-Schultz Clinic stability is a central theme acknowledging that instability can lead to additional wear and tear, degeneration and injury.  To understand the importance of stability refer to  our e-book, Orthopedics 2.0

Stability is dependent upon 2 principal factors:  muscle strength and ligament integrity.

The iliolumbar ligament (ILL)I s an important stabilizer of the lumbar spine.  Ligaments are fibrous tissue that connect one or more bones together.  Think of them as duct tape.   The ILL originates from the lateral aspect of the transverse process of L4 and L5 and attaches to the anterior surface of the ilium (waist bone).  The ligament literally prevents the L5 vertebra from slipping forward.

iliolumbar ligament

Pool-Goudzwaard also demonstrated that it ILL was an important stabilizer of the SI joint.

The iliolumbar ligament can be injected under x-ray guidance or MSK ultrasound which is the standard of care at the Centeno-Schultz Clinic.  Below is an x-ray image from clinic with the ILL outlined.

The Regenexx-DDD procedure deals with both the lax ligaments and the irritated nerves without using harmful steroids.  The procedure involves platelet growth factors that are injected into the epidural space as well as into the lax ligaments.  Previous blogs have discussed clinical cases where patients have utilized their own platelet growth factors and avoided lumbar surgery.

iliolumbar ligament x-ray

Advertisements

1 Comment »

  1. My back has been totally out of whack for at least a year (had a bunch of injuries and was basically confined to abbreviated bedrest). So I have been working out lately and I am trying to “reactivitate” all my back muscles and it is messed up! Think I am making some progress though. Makes like crunchy noises and snapping noise (maybe the ligament your talking about). Anyways, maybe I will post how things go.

    Comment by Harry — November 6, 2013 @ 9:55 pm


RSS feed for comments on this post. TrackBack URI

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: